Archive for the ‘Platt Excerpts’ Category

  1. David Platt’s Personal Testimony

    Posted on September 1st, 2014 by Jonathan

    In Ephesians, Paul tells us that “even when we were dead in our trespasses, [God] made us alive together with Christ” (Eph 2:5). Going from death to life is at the core of every conversion story, and in the sense that there is certainly no such thing as a boring resurrection, no one has a boring testimony. Still, some transformations are more dramatic than others. And while it can easily seem that God’s grace is more profound in the saving of a Paul-former-Saul than it is in the saving of a scripturally-reared-Timothy (2 Tim 3:15), this is not the case. Boring testimonies are boring because God’s graciously made them that way (so they aren’t really boring at all).

    In the video below, David Platt describes the amazing grace of such a testimony as he gives glory to God for a family and church that led him to Christ as a child.

  2. Marks of a Disciple

    Posted on August 28th, 2014 by David Burnette

    Precept Ministries International just posted an article titled “Marks of a Disciple” based on a sermon by David Platt. You can get the full article here. Here’s an excerpt that includes 5 questions to act on as you think about how to grow as a disciple of Christ:

    From the very beginning, Jesus told His disciples in Matthew 4:19, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.” Every follower should be a fisher . . . not fishing for men all over the lake, but spreading the gospel all over the world. At the end of Matthew, Jesus tells his disciples, “Go therefore and make disciples” (Matt 28:19). Then in Acts 1:8 he tells them that they will receive power from the Holy Spirit, not just so that they can go to Bible studies and worship and be a kind person, but so that they would be witnesses—to testify about him “to the end of the earth.”

    God has not saved you to dwell in a Christian bubble; God has saved you to spread the Christian gospel, both in the city where you live and to the ends of the earth. This is what we were created for, what we’ve been commissioned to do as a church. This is what we’re compelled to do as Christians, to be disciples who make disciples so that the grace and love of God are spread all over the world through us!


    Some Questions to Act On

    Let me ask you a question: How are you making disciples? You may be tempted to think, “I don’t know if I can really make disciples.” If that’s you, then I want to let you in on a secret: you can’t. But that’s the whole point. God has put His Holy Spirit in you, and He has equipped you and empowered you to do that which you could never do on your own. That’s the whole point of Christianity. God has not saved you to sit on the sidelines and to do what you’re capable of doing. He has saved you to live on the front lines and experience what He alone is capable of doing.

    One of the ways we can grow as disciple-makers is by being intentional and consistent in how we pursue God and walk in obedience to his mission.  The five questions below are designed to help you in that process. I want to challenge you to think about the following questions and spend some time answering them. Be specific in your answers.

    To grow as a disciple maker in the coming days . . .

    1. How will I fill my mind with truth?

    How can you be intentional to read God’s Word? The life of the disciple is the life of a learner; we want to learn from Christ and we want His Word to fill our minds. This includes memorizing God’s Word and learning from others.  And remember, the goal in filling our mind with truth is not just to gain information, but to experience transformation. We want to hear the truth of God’s Word, and at the same time we want to apply and experience the truth of God’s Word.

    2. How will I fuel my affections for God?

    Even as I’m encouraging you to ask these questions, I realize that if we’re not careful, even Bible reading (or other spiritual disciplines) can become mechanical and monotonous, which is not the point. Our goal is not just to know God; our goal is to love God. So what can you do to fuel affection, to stoke the fires of passion for God?

    Worship is one of the avenues for fueling our affections for God. As a follower of Christ, I hope that you are a member of a local church body and that you are committed to prioritize weekly worship with your church—more than weekend sports or other weekend activities that would keep you from worship.

    Prayer is monumental in fueling our affections for God. Designate a time and a place when you go into your room, shut the door, and pray to your Father, who is unseen. This one practice alone will utterly revolutionize your life.

    Fasting is another way to fuel our affection for God. Commit to setting aside a meal once a week or once every few weeks, or maybe more as time progresses. When you fast, pray something like this: “More than I want food, I just want to feast on God in prayer and in His Word.  More than food to satisfy my hunger, I want to be satisfied with Christ.”

    Our giving can also fuel our affections for God. You might think, “What does giving have to do with affection for God?” According to Jesus, giving has everything to do with affection for God. Matthew 6:21 tells us that, “Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.” Instead of tithing being the ceiling of your giving, why not make tithing the floor of your giving, and give generously and sacrificially to His glory?

    3. How will I share God’s love as a witness in the world?

    Who has God put in your life (in your sphere of influence) who does not know Christ? Write down the names of three, five, or maybe even ten people you know who don’t know Christ. Pray for them this year, and work by God’s grace to see them come to Christ. What is going to be your plan for sharing Christ with them? Think of ways you can specifically and deliberately create opportunities to share the gospel with those people. It could be through an invitation to breakfast, lunch, dinner, or coffee. Is there some other activity or avenue you could explore, whether that’s something as involved as spending a day or weekend with them, or something as simple as writing a letter to them?

    4. How will I spread God’s glory among all peoples?

    We have been commanded to make disciples of all nations, and that is not just a command for extraordinary missionaries; that is a command for ordinary disciples.  So how is your life going to play a part in the spread of God’s glory to the ends of the earth? Consider these three ways:

    Pray: One of the ways we can spread God’s glory among all peoples is to pray. You and I have the opportunity to be a part of what God is doing around the world from our knees. You might use a resource like Operation World (OperationWorld.org) to pray for the nations of the world.

    Give: We can also be a part of what God is doing through our giving. Though we may not always feel like it, we are the richest people to ever walk planet earth.  How can we sacrifice to give to the needs of the world?

    Go: In order to spread God’s glory among all peoples we need to go to the nations. Think through any and every way you might spend your life, lead your family, or leverage your work to go to the people groups of the world with the gospel. Our lives should be a blank check on the table . . . no strings attached.

    5. One final question: How will I make disciple makers among a few people?

    Jesus, more than anyone else who has ever lived, was most passionate about the Father’s glory among all nations, yet He poured His life into a few people. So how can you do the same thing?

    As a disciple-maker, you want to spend your life multiplying the gospel in such a way that you help equip, empower, and embolden the people around you to start making disciples as well.

  3. Who Are the Unreached and Why Must We Go to Them?

    Posted on August 21st, 2014 by David Burnette

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    What does it mean to be part of an Unreached People Group (UPG)? How do unreached peoples stand before God? What is our obligation, as followers of Christ, to those who have no access to the gospel?

    The following outline provides a good summary for these kinds of questions. The outline was taken from Pastor David Platt’s sermon titled “Our Obligation to the Unreached,” and is based on Paul’s teaching in Romans 1-3 about man’s inherent sinful condition. To access the sermon in its entirety, including the outline below, go here.

     

    Who are the Unreached?

    • A people group among whom there is no indigenous community of believing Christians able to engage the people group with church planting.
    • Technically speaking, the percentage of evangelical Christians in this people group is less than two percent.

    How Many People Are Unreached?

    • Over 6,500 people groups are unreached . . .

    Including at least two billion individual people

    • Over 3,000 are also unengaged (meaning there is currently no evangelical church planting strategy under way to reach that people group) . . .

    Including around 200 million individual people

    What Does It Mean To Be Unreached?

    • Practically . . .

    You do not currently have access to the gospel.

    Unless something changes, you will likely be born, live, and die without ever hearing the gospel.

    • Biblically . . .

    You have knowledge of God.

    You have rejected God.

    You stand condemned before God.

    You have never heard the good news about how you can be saved by God.

    Why Must We Go To The Unreached?

    • Because their knowledge of God is only enough to damn them to hell.
    • Because the gospel of God is powerful enough to save them forever.
    • Because the plan of God warrants the sacrifices of His people.
    • Because the Son of God deserves the praise of all peoples.

    To learn more about unreached peoples, visit Joshua Project.

  4. “I love you, but can’t stand your wife.”

    Posted on July 3rd, 2014 by Jonathan

    The room was packed full of people, and the preacher held the audience in the palm of his hand. “I would like everyone to bow your heads and close your eyes,” he said, and we all followed suit.

    He then declared, “Tonight, I want to call you to put your faith in God. Tonight, I am urging you to begin a personal relationship with Jesus for the first time in your life. Let me be clear,” he said, “I’m not inviting you to join the church. I’m just inviting you to come to Christ.” As the preacher passionately pleaded for personal decisions, scores of people stood from their seats and walked down the aisles of the auditorium to make a commitment to Christ.

    Yet there was a problem in all of this. These people had been deceived. They had been told that it is possible to make a commitment to Christ apart from a commitment to the church. The reality, however, is that it’s biblically impossible to follow Christ apart from joining his church. In fact, anyone who claims to be a Christian yet is not an active member of a church may not actually be a follower of Christ at all.

    To some, maybe many, this may sound heretical. “Are you saying that joining the church makes someone a Christian?” you might ask. Absolutely not. Joining a church most certainly does not make someone a Christian.

    At the same time, to identify your life with the person of Christ is to join your life with the people of Christ. To surrender your life to his commands is to commit your life to his church. It is biblically, spiritually, and practically impossible to be a disciple of Christ (and much less make disciples of Christ) apart from total devotion to a family of Christians.

    But so many people think it is possible–and they try to live like it’s possible. It has even become a mark of spiritual maturity today for some professing Christians to not be active in a church. “I’m in love with Jesus,” people will say, “but I just can’t stand the church.”

    Really?

    Isn’t the church the bride of Christ? What if I said to you, “Man, I love you, but have I ever told you how much I can’t stand your wife?” Would you take that as a compliment?

    Similarly, isn’t the church the body of Christ? What if my wife said to me, “David, I love you, but I can’t stand your body”? I can assure you that I wouldn’t take that as a compliment.

    It’s impossible to follow Jesus fully without loving his bride selflessly, and it’s impossible to think we can enjoy Christ apart from his body. Jesus goes so far as to identify the church with himself when he asks Saul on the road to Damascus, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” Saul hadn’t persecuted Christ himself, but he had persecuted Christians, so in essence Jesus was saying, “When you mess with them, you mess with me.”

    To come to Christ is to become part of his church. Followers of Jesus have the privilege of being identified with his family. As we die to ourselves, we live for others, and everything Christ does in us begins to affect everyone Christ puts around us. Recognizing this reality and experiencing the relationship that God has designed for his people specifically in the church are essential to being a disciple and making disciples of all nations.

    The above excerpt can be found on pages 149-151 of Follow Me: A Call to Die. A Call to Live by David Platt.

  5. 1 Comment

    Family Worship in the Platt House

    Posted on July 2nd, 2014 by Eric Parker

    In discussing the blessing of having regular family worship, Pastor David describes for us a typical night at the Platt house including “silly songs.”

    Go here to access this sermon, “The Gospel for Generations Past and Future,” in it’s entirety.

    To help in this area of family worship, we provide Family Worship Guides for free on our website. Simply go to any individual sermon from 2010–present (under the Resource tab) and click on the Materials dropdown box. Go here to view a sample.

    Family Worship Guides were created to help you read, study the Bible, pray, and worship together as a family. These guides also include helpful tips for making family worship appropriate for children of different ages. Adapt them to fit your particular situation.

  6. 1 Comment

    Only One Way To God?

    Posted on June 5th, 2014 by Eric Parker

    David Platt helps us gain some much needed perspective when we ask the question “Why is there only one way to God?” Go here to access this message in its entirety.

  7. 2 Comments

    Why David Platt Uses The Word “Radical”

    Posted on June 4th, 2014 by Jonathan

    From Pastor David’s sermon, The Gospel and the Rich, on February 9, 2014 …

    I want to be clear: using this word is not intended to distinguish radical Christianity from some other brand of Christianity. It’s intended to show that biblical Christianity–true, authentic Christianity–is inevitably radical Christianity.  For you and for anyone in this room to come to Jesus means to lay down your life and your possessions and your pursuits and your family and your future–your everything–to surrender to him. Jesus never calls a person to partial, casual discipleship … cultural discipleship. There’s one option: radical discipleship. It’s the surrender of everything you have and everything you are to Jesus. 

    So to every Christian in this room, to every follower of Christ, you have surrendered the right to determine the direction of your life. You do not determine where you live. You do not determine how you live.  You do not determine how you spend your money. You have relinquished that right.  He determines all of these things. Your role, and my role, is not to consider what he says and then decide what we think about it. Your role, and my role, is to listen and obey. He’s Lord.

  8. Church and Kingdom

    Posted on May 19th, 2014 by Eric Parker

    In Secret Church 9, “The Body of Christ”, Pastor David helps us think through the difference between the Church and the Kingdom of God. To access this Secret Church it in its entirety, click here.

  9. Let Everything that has Breath Praise the Lord!

    Posted on May 15th, 2014 by Eric Parker

    Pastor David quoting from the Psalms, calls God’s people to give God glory. You can find this message in its entirety by going here.

  10. From Fear to Faith: A Look at the Pslams

    Posted on May 14th, 2014 by Jonathan

    Perhaps no book in the Bible is as directly helpful for pushing people to cry out to God than Psalms. Take Psalm 56, for instance …

    At no fault of his own, David was a fugitive.

    Fleeing King Saul–murderous with jealous hatred toward David–he sought refuge in Gath. Not long after arriving in Goliath’s hometown (who David had struck down and whose sword he now carried), he was seized by Achish, the king of Gath. It was in these desperate circumstances that David penned Psalm 56. “When I am afraid, I put my trust in you. In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust; I shall not be afraid. What can flesh do to me?” (vv 3-4).

    What could man do to David? A lot. After all, he was not just at odds with the school bully who wanted his lunch money. We were talking about Saul and Achish, kings who had authority … and who did not exactly count David a friend. How, then, does he get from “when I am afraid” to “I shall not be afraid”?

    The answer is clear: he trusts in the character of God and praises the Word of God (vv 3-4, 10-11). God is an omnipotent, merciful, just, and caring Deliverer who gives light to life. And God’s Word is supreme, sure, and sufficient.

    While we may not be able to directly identify with a to-be king on the run from two other kings who want him dead, we can definitely find some common ground. If you’ve ever felt overwhelmed, been opposed, felt alone, or been afraid, then take comfort in Psalm 56 and let it propel you to trust in God and praise his Word. The God in whom David trusted and the Word David praised has not changed–he is just as true and just as dependable today. You need only to turn to him.

    There is a difference though. When we trust in God’s character and praise God’s Word today, we do so in the Son of God. Jesus Christ is the fullness of God’s character and the Word made flesh. So when we let Psalm 56 instruct us in our time of need, our gaze is directed toward Jesus.

    The above was from Pastor David’s sermon “From Fear to Faith,” which kicked off a six-week-period in which three Psalms will be taught each week. We’ll be posting Psalm-related encouragement here on our blog throughout the mini series. You can access last week’s messages here:

    How Do I Glorify God?” – Psalm 57
    The Confession of Man and the Compassion of God” – Psalm 51
    The Steadfast Love of God’s Adoption” – Psalm 52