Archive for the ‘Pray for the Persecuted’ Category

  1. The Secret Church Prayer Focus

    Posted on January 12th, 2015 by Jonathan

    If, in the busyness of the holiday season, you missed our announcement last month, the Secret Church 15 prayer focus is the Peoples of Vietnam.

    If you’re new to Secret Church, that may leave you with more questions than answers. So to learn what exactly the prayer focus is, watch the two minute video below. You can also explore the prayer focus websites from last year or the year before that.

    As the video explained, it’s more than a few minutes on the night of Secret Church. After Secret Church, we’ll be devoting the entire month of May to focused prayer for Vietnam, so now is the time to begin thinking and praying about how you can encourage your church or small group to pray for the Peoples of Vietnam.

  2. Responding to Persecution

    Posted on January 2nd, 2015 by Jonathan

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    “Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for so they persecuted the prophets who were before you.” – Matthew 5:11-12

    For over two years, Pastor Saeed Abedini has been imprisoned in Iran for Christian activity. For over five years, Christians in Nigeria have suffered fatal attack after fatal attack at the hands of the terrorist group Boko Haram. For five and a half years, Asia Bibi has been awaiting execution in a Pakistani prison for supposed blasphemy against Allah. These are just a few of the known situations in which Christians are suffering violent injustice. So what are we, their fellow brothers and sisters in Christ, supposed to do? Is Jesus suggesting that we smile and nod as if all is well?

    First, let’s shed some light on Jesus’ striking statement about persecution, above.

    Though not exactly parallel, consider exercise. There is a cost for getting fit. If you’ve ever had trouble walking down a set of stairs after doing squats or difficulty brushing your teeth after doing curls, you know what it feels like. It may be painful, and some instances may be worse than others, but it’s a good hurt. Your sore muscles prove that you’ve been using them and mean you’re getting stronger.

    Now think about persecution. In the terms of our exercise analogy, persecution isn’t the work-out… it’s the soreness. Just as people don’t go to the gym to get sore, Christians don’t share the gospel to get a violent backlash. That’s not the goal. You go to the gym to become stronger, and you proclaim the gospel that God may be glorified. That is the goal.

    When we don’t have this end goal in view, we can often have an improper perspective on the type of persecution (and subsequent rejoicing) Jesus talks about in Matthew 5. We can shortsightedly look at this passage, and others like it, and conclude that persecution is a “blessed” thing in itself. But that’s not what Jesus says – he blesses persecuted people, not persecution. And why? Because being reviled, persecuted, and slandered is simply evidence of acting on Jesus’ account. And just because he blesses them, doesn’t mean their aches and tears go away. There’s a subtle, yet key, difference between rejoicing in such suffering and enjoying it. Although people don’t enjoy sore muscles, they can be glad about sore muscles because it means they’re getting stronger. In the same way, although our brothers and sister don’t enjoy persecution, they can be glad about persecution because it means they’re proclaiming Christ.

    I think this is what Jesus is saying – we can rejoice in persecution even though it isn’t enjoyable. But this has more to do with the attitude and demeanor of the persecuted than it does our response. Are we supposed to do anything about it? Yes. There are at least three things we should do in response to the persecution of Christians, and none of them include passive smiling and nodding.

    First, we should be challenged to spread the gospel. The reality is, Christians are not persecuted for relegating their worship and witness to the home. Persecution occurs in opposition to gospel proclamation. When we hear of brothers and sisters being persecuted for boldly sharing their faith, we should ask ourselves, “Am I sharing my faith? Am taking advantage of my freedom?”

    Second, we should pray for the persecuted. We can’t overemphasize this response even though it is an obvious one. What may not be as obvious, though, is what to pray. Acts 4:24-30 provides a helpful starting point: pray for their continued boldness, the power of the Holy Spirit, and fruitfulness. But do we pray for their safety? Yes! That leads to the last response…

    Third, we should advocate for freedom and justice on behalf of the persecuted. As part of the body with them, we suffer when they do. Fighting for their well-being is part of loving our brothers and sisters well. Believers are to follow Jesus’ example of standing up on behalf of the oppressed, Christian or not. Where there is injustice, we labor for justice to reflect our just God. And on top of all that, we should fight for their freedom to proclaim the God-glorifying gospel, because, again, that is the ultimate goal.

  3. Being More About Missions in 2015 . . . Practically

    Posted on December 29th, 2014 by Jonathan

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    Most of us would do well to be more involved in global missions. But it simply won’t do to make a New Year’s resolution to “be more missional” . . . you are likely already well aware that you should be praying more, giving more, and/or going more. Knowing how to do these things is another matter, and not knowing where to begin can leave you feeling overwhelmed and discouraged.

    So, below are several starting points. The list is not meant to be exhaustive, but practical and manageable. It may even get you thinking about other ways you can be more about the Great Commission.

    Write a Missionary Every Month
    There is little more encouraging to missionaries than genuine interest in their ministry from friends and family back home. When you take the time to sit down and ask them how they are doing, update them on what’s new with you, share what God is teaching you, and tell them how you are praying for them, your care is evident. You, too, will be blessed, encouraged, and challenged by this practice. Though emails are good, an occasional hand-written letter is a nice touch. And every so often, send a care package.

    Educate Yourself on Regions of the World
    Choose different areas of the world to learn about and pray for. The regions could be big (ex: Siberia) or small (ex: Lebanon), and you can shift your focus once a month, twice a month, or once a quarter. Learn about the area’s people groups, culture, government, economy, and history. Make it a family activity, and have fun with it. You can prepare a meal common to the region, listen the its traditional music, or play a game/sport that originates there. As you begin to appreciate the area’s people and culture, you will see it as less of an abstract shape on a map and more of a real place with real people who have real physical and spiritual needs.

    Serve International Students at a Nearby College
    It’s often surprising how many people groups are present when you look around you. What might be more surprising is the large number of them who are never invited into an American home. Try seeking them out. You might go to ethnic restaurants, markets, or other places where they gather, but one of the most natural channels is through your local college or university. Many of them have sizable populations of international students who are studying abroad in America, and some them even have programs set up to connect them to Americans. Ask if there’s any way you can get involved.

    Organize a Fundraiser
    The less missionaries have to worry about sustaining themselves, the more they can focus on the work at hand. Consider organizing a car wash, a tournament, a garage sale, or some other creative method of raising money for a missionary family, organization, or church fund. Whether or not you already give, a world missions fundraiser has several benefits. 1) They can be effective ways to quickly raise and give more money than a small group of individuals can give on their own. 2) Fundraisers also raise awareness – among both the people giving and the people you recruit to help put it on. This can often be more valuable than any monetary gain. 3) Going out of your way to set up a fundraiser helps create solidarity with missionaries in the field while greatly encouraging them at the same time.

    Serve Missionaries on Furlough
    If your church has commissioned missionaries, ask your church leaders if and when they’ll be returning on furlough, and find out what their needs are. Do they need a place to stay for a couple of months? Do they need a car? A cell phone? Once you know what their practical needs are, see if there’s anything you can do to help meet them, even sacrificially.

    Pray for the Persecuted
    Many of you already pray for unreached people groups with the help of resources like PeopleGroups.org, Operation World, or Joshua Project. As you continue this, remember that proclamation of the gospel to the least reached is often accompanied by opposition and persecution. Learn of specific ways to begin praying for persecuted Christians and the ones imposing it on them with the help of Open Doors or Voice of the Martyrs.

  4. ANNOUNCEMENT: The SC 15 Prayer Focus is . . .

    Posted on December 18th, 2014 by Jonathan

    Pray for Vietnam Logo Trans Background… the Peoples of Vietnam! That’s who we’ll be learning about in the coming months, who we’ll pray for together the night of Secret Church, and who we’ll pray for throughout the month of May and beyond. There is much more to be said about the people groups in Vietnam and why they’re worthy of our collective focus, but for now, pray about how you might involve your small group and/or church in supporting the work there.

    Be sure to keep your eye on the blog (as well as Facebook and Twitter) in the coming weeks and months as we learn and pray together… because you don’t have to wait until April 24th to start praying.

  5. Christians in Kilns, Advent of Unity, Discerning God’s Will

    Posted on November 21st, 2014 by Jonathan

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    Refiner’s Fire: Christians in the Kilns: In Pakistan’s Punjab district, 13 out of 19 brick kiln workers are Christians. They are effectively slaves, overworked and mistreated. Tragically, Christians Shahzad Masih and his pregnant wife, Shama Bibi, were killed by a mob in the brick kiln in which they worked earlier this month.

    Advent of Unity: Peter Leinhart beautifully shows how the coming of Christ was the coming of unity. “Advent marks a ‘genesis’ because in Jesus the human race gets a fresh start. Advent celebrates the Advent of humanity’s reunion, the coming of what Paul calls ‘one new man.'”

    8 Essential Components for Discerning God’s Will: “I know that some people maintain that God doesn’t have a will for our lives beyond our sanctification,” says David Sills, “but He does.” These are the eight biblical considerations he offers to those who are eager to discern their role in God’s global plan.

  6. 1 Comment

    We Aren’t Fighting ISIS

    Posted on November 3rd, 2014 by Jonathan

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    Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm. (Ephesians 6:10-13)

    One of the fundamental rules of war is that you must know who your enemies are. That in mind, when it comes to spiritual warfare . . .

    There’s good news, and there’s bad news.

    The good news is we aren’t fighting ISIS. Neither are we battling ebola, abortion, atheism, poverty, religious persecution, or godless social agendas. We do not battle flesh and blood. That is to say, we are not at war with people or earthly trials. That’s the good news.

    The bad news is that our actual enemies are far more sinister and powerful than ISIS. In the Ephesians 6 passage above, Paul describes them as cosmic powers over this present darkness and spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places, the devil their leader schemer. Were he to stop there, we would have reason to lose hope.

    Thankfully though, the passage doesn’t end with bad news. In the remainder of the chapter, Paul – taking into account both who is for us and who is against us – outlines a winning battle plan. Here are a few of the takeaways:

    1. We are fighting for the souls of men. With eternal destinations in the crosshairs of the cosmic powers, declaring the gospel in everything becomes our primary aim.
    2. We are quick to fall to our knees in prayer and slow to rise. We are not spiritual Rambos who carry victory on our soldiers, but weaklings facing formidable enemies, dependent on a mighty Lord.
    3. We first arm ourselves for spiritual battle, not physical or ideological. Prayer, the gospel, righteousness, faith, salvation, the Spirit . . . this is God’s armor.

    Let’s not be distracted from the real war by flesh-and-blood skirmishes on the fringe. Let’s not let our emotions rule our reactions, either – seething with unrighteous anger toward the lost or cowering with inappropriate fear of man. In the end, though our real foes are menacing, our sovereign Friend reigns victorious. The way we fight should be determined by who we’re fighting AND who has already won.

  7. Susan’s Story

    Posted on October 29th, 2014 by Jonathan

    We don’t normally think of persecution occurring in countries like Uganda, but it does. Susan’s story should remind us that each day, Christians all over the world face intense opposition–in the obviously brutal North Koreas and the deceptively “Christian” Ugandas. Whatever the context, unlike Susan, most of their stories go untold. This should compel us to pray.

    For this reason, let me encourage you to participate in the International Day of Prayer for the persecuted church through a free and interactive webcast hosted by Open Doors on November 1st and 2nd. The first night allows for interaction with believers from all over the world, and the second night is designed as a time of worship together. Special guests include David Platt, Nik Ripken, and Selah.

    This is a great opportunity for your small group or church to get together and pray. For suffering believers we know of, like Susan. For believers whose suffering is unknown to us. And for those under whose hand they suffer. May this webcast faithfully serve the persecuted church as it encourages you to give Christ’s name the honor it is due, wherever you find yourself . . . North Korea, Uganda, or the United States.

    To participate in Open Doors’ free, interactive webcast, RSVP here.

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  8. Squeezing Persecution

    Posted on October 7th, 2014 by Jonathan

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    It’s no stretch to say that believers suffering the atrocities of North Korean prison camps or ISIS invasions are being persecuted. They are in extreme situations that call for a proportionally extreme amount of prayer and attention. We may be left to wonder, though, how we should think about believers whose faith is being attacked in less horrific ways. Is it fair to classify anything less than outright violence as persecution?

    This is where it may be helpful to think of persecution in a couple of different ways. Open Doors (OD) speaks of “smashing” and “squeezing.” Smashing is violent. When you think smashing, think ISIS and North Korea. But squeezing, OD explains, is more about pressure.

    “While it would seem that smash is the most prevalent and invasive expression of persecution, it is often the squeeze that is most prevalent and invasive,” said OD on their World Watch List website. This is because squeezing pervades society, affecting the Christian’s whole life, and it can be imposed from a variety of different angles–social expectations, government, family, employers, etc. Additionally, when Christians are being squeezed, they are often suppressed to the point of total silence. If the goal of persecution is to silence witness, then it could be said that squeezing is often more effective than beating and imprisonment, because more overt hostility can sometimes serve as a megaphone for Christ.

    But if you’re like me, you need some examples. To help us think through what squeezing may look like, turn your attention to the intersection of Europe and Asia: Turkey. Though Christianity in the 97% Muslim country is no longer illegal, many Turks make concerted efforts to undermine its spread (for example, by placing superfluous requirements on congregations looking to build). Though hard to measure, the social strain for Christians in Turkey can be overwhelming. When a Muslim decides to follow Christ, their friends and family often treat them with contempt because they feel betrayed. This is what our Turkish brother in Christ, Erman, experienced when his father died. As the eldest son, he was expected to pray at his father’s Muslim funeral, but as a Christian, his conscience would not permit him to. Erman was squeezed. There was pain, both for him and his family, and judgement from the community.

    Now let’s come a little closer to home. A lot closer, actually. Many of you have probably heard about the turmoil surrounding Washington florist, Barronelle Stutzman. When so called same-sex marriage became legal in Washington state, a gay couple who Stutzman had been serving for close to a decade asked her to do their wedding. Although Stutzman agonized over the decision because of their friendship, her Christian convictions about marriage would not permit her to contribute to their celebration with her flower arrangements. Now, she is being sued for everything she’s worth by both the state of Washington and the couple whom she had served for so long. Watch the video below for a more complete picture of her story.

    Though she isn’t in danger of being burned at the stake, her business is at stake, simply because she wanted to peaceably act according to her religious convictions. In the words of Denny Burk, “This [Stutzman being sued] is a great injustice, and I hope people will see this for what it is–persecution.”

    It’s important that we realize such squeezing is, in fact, persecution, so that we are not ignorant and, subsequently, idle in situations that don’t reflect God’s justice. The opposition these forgotten sufferers are facing falls short of firing squads and torture, but they still deserve our attention. Plus, smashing persecution probably didn’t start that way. And though our response to situations like the ones facing Stutzman and Erman may be different than our response to the situations found in North Korea and Iraq, it ought still be marked by urgency, and it ought still be drenched in prayer.

    Whether crushed or squeezed, persecuted Christians are just that: persecuted. Our recognition of this fact not only helps us to see that they are worthy of our attention, prayer, and active support… it helps us keep watch of our own horizon.

    For more on Open Doors, go to their website. To RSVP for their free International Day of Prayer webcast, go here.

  9. From Open Doors, may this serve as a healthy reminder that church bombings and Boko Haram kidnappings should not be viewed simply as intriguing headlines. They are real trials faced by real Christians just like you and me.

    The International Day of Prayer (IDOP) for persecuted Christians is coming up, and Open Doors is hosting a free, interactive webcast. If you want to join in on November 1 and 2, RSVP here. But don’t wait to begin praying for the persecuted church. Let the stories from Nigeria remind you that, in many places around the world, hostility toward believers is real. And it’s happening now.

  10. That Muslims May See Christ’s Surpassing Beauty

    Posted on September 12th, 2014 by David Burnette

    Kevin DeYoung posted the following prayer by Samuel M. Zwemer (1867-1952), an RCA minister and Princeton professor known as “The Apostle to Islam”:

    “Almighty God, our Heavenly Father, who hast made of one blood all nations and hast promised that many shall come from the East and sit down with Abraham in thy kingdom: We pray for thy prodigal children in Muslim lands who are still afar off, that they may be brought nigh by the blood of Christ. Look upon them in pity, because they are ignorant of thy truth.

    Take away pride of intellect and blindness of heart, and reveal to them the surpassing beauty and power of thy Son Jesus Christ. Convince them of their sin in rejecting the atonement of the only Savior. Give moral courage to those who love thee, that they may boldly confess thy name.

    Hasten the day of religious freedom in Turkey, Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, and North Africa. Send forth reapers where the harvest is ripe, and faithful plowmen to break furrows in lands still neglected. May the tribes of Africa and Malaysia not fall prey to Islam but be won for Christ. Bless the ministry of healing in every hospital, and the ministry of love at every church and mission. May all Muslim children in mission schools be led to Christ and accept him as their personal Savior.

    Strengthen converts, restore backsliders, and give all those who labor among Muslims the tenderness of Christ, so that bruised reeds may become pillars of his church, and smoking flaxwicks burning and shining lights. Make bare thine arm, O God, and show thy power. All our expectation is from thee.

    Father, the hour has come; glorify thy Son in the Muslim world, and fulfill through him the prayer of Abraham thy friend, “O, that Ishmael might live before thee.” For Jesus’ sake. Amen.”

    — Taken from Islam and the Cross: Selections from “The Apostle to Islam” (edited by Roger Greenway).