Posts Tagged ‘Justin Taylor’

  1. Well Said: Holy Week Edition

    Posted on April 18th, 2014 by Cory Varden

    Resources for Understanding and Explaining Easter, Stand to Reason: Don’t let this Easter season pass you by without some reflection on what it means and why it matters. Here are some resources to help you do this.

    Easter and ethics: How the resurrection reshapes the Christian life, Phillip Bethancourt: What is the relationship between Easter and ethics? How does the crucifixion shape the Christian life? How does the resurrection reorient our moral intuitions?

    Five Errors to Drop From Your Easter Sermon,Andreas J. Köstenberger and Justin Taylor: If you want to help people see Holy Week with fresh eyes, start by dropping these familiar fallacies.

  2. Well Said…

    Posted on July 19th, 2013 by Cory Varden

    1. Packer: Too Many Churches in North America Are Playing the Number Game by Justin Taylor: I have found that churches, pastors, seminaries, and parachurch agencies throughout North America are mostly playing the numbers game—that is, defining success in terms of numbers of heads counted or added to those that were there before.

    2. Ten Gospel Verses to Keep Warm by David Mathis: When you memorize a “gospel verse,” and keep it warm, you have hidden in your heart a divinely inspired and inerrant expression, in human language, of the very point of the whole Bible and all of history. You carry with you the sword of the Spirit in its strongest alloy.

    3. The Central Tragedy of this Case Remains—Trayvon Martin Belongs to Us All by Albert Mohler: America is divided once again in the aftermath of the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. Americans are divided along some very tragic and recognizable lines in the wake of the verdict. But the line that I find most important is this—the line between those parents who have to have that talk with their boys and those who do not.

  3. “Tremendous Moral Courage”

    Posted on January 21st, 2013 by Jonathan Lenning

    Today our nation celebrates the achievements of Martin Luther King, Jr.  The great strides taken in the Civil Rights Movement were, in large part, due to King’s involvement in it.  His “I Have a Dream” speech from the Lincoln Memorial is one of the most famous speeches in American history.

    But for today, Justin Taylor recommends reading “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” which King composed after being arrested for civil disobedience under Birmingham’s infamous Bull Connor, then Public Safety Commissioner.  Taylor deems it ”a moving letter, not only for its rhetoric but also for its natural-law argument rooted in the Christian tradition.”  He goes on, “Yes, King was a man of moral failing, neo-orthodox theology, and political shrewdness, but in certain areas he exhibited tremendous moral courage.”

    Take a few minutes to read it, and celebrate all the good that King said and did.

  4. Well Said…

    Posted on January 18th, 2013 by Cory Varden

    This January is the 40th anniversary of the Roe v Wade Court decision that legalized abortion in our nation for any reason. It also opened the door to deep sorrow and regret for many who chose abortion, thinking it held the promise of “reproductive freedom.”  In light of that this week’s Well Said… focuses on some insightful posts this week on this issue.

    1. Why I Hate Sanctity of Human Life Sunday (and Why I Love It Too) from Russell Moore: As we approach next week’s fortieth anniversary of the infamous Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision, churches in my tradition will observe Sanctity of Human Life Sunday. I hate that we have to. Let me explain why…

    2. Thank You, Mr. President, for These Pro-Life Marching Orders from Justin Taylor

    3. Away With Utilitarian Arguments Against Abortion from Jared Wilson: You have likely heard this line of reasoning from earnest pro-lifers before. The logic goes something like this: You should be pro-life because you never know if you’ve aborted the next Einstein, the next Beethoven, the next Martin Luther King, Jr., the next Pasteur or Salk, etc. What if you aborted the curer of cancer or AIDS?…

  5. Through the Word in 2013

    Posted on December 31st, 2012 by David Burnette

    1539 Great BibleOf the many things you could do in 2013, it’s hard to think of anything more spiritually beneficial than reading God’s Word and being changed by it. With that goal, a Bible Reading Plan for the year can be extremely helpful to give some structure for this critical spiritual discipline.

    In terms of Bible Reading Plans, it’s tough to improve on the comprehensive list provided by Justin Taylor. You can check that out here. Of the many short summaries of these excellent plans, here’s one worth highlighting:

    Product Details“George Guthrie’s “Read the Bible for Life Chronological Bible Reading Plan” is takes you through the whole Bible in the basic order of events, with a reading each day. There’s also a 4 + 1 plan (similar to the others, in that you read from four different places each day plus the Psalms). But it’s a semi-chronological plan, placing the prophets and the NT letters in basic chronological order.”

     

    For those going through the Multiply Material (or considering going through it), there’s a 24-week reading plan that accompanies the material. The Multiply Reading Plan is available here on YouVersion.

     

     

     

     

  6. Well Said…

    Posted on November 2nd, 2012 by David Burnette

    1. Cultivating a Heart for the Lost: Like Paul, our belief in God’s sovereignty ought to lead to a real concern for the lost. Justin Taylor summarizes 7 steps for cultivating a heart for the lost from a sermon by John Piper on Romans 10:1.

    2. Why Zombies Matter: Why are we fascinated with zomblies, and what does that have to do with the gospel of Jesus Christ? Russell Moore with some food for thought on Halloween.

    3. I’m Not Much of a Reader: Regardless of how you’re wired, Jared Wilson reminds us how foolish it is to neglect God’s Word simply because you don’t enjoy reading. The God of the universe has spoken, after all.