Posts Tagged ‘unreached’

  1. 1 Comment

    The Syrian Refugee Crisis

    Posted on July 13th, 2015 by Jonathan

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    According to the 2015 World Watch List, Syria is the fourth most hostile country in the world for Christians living there, in large part because of the growing presence and control of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Christians are among those most marginalized and endangered, but between the Islamic State’s harsh implementation of sharia law and the ongoing violence of civil war, they aren’t the only only ones suffering. This is evidenced by the astounding number of Syrians forced to flee from their homes.

    Some 6.5 million Syrians have been internally displaced, while around 4 million have been displaced to surrounding countries, and some still beyond. Numbers like these are so big that they can actually be ineffective. Rather than helping us feel the tragic weight of human suffering, we’re left to grapple with an intangible statistic. In reality, these numbers represent individual people. Most are lost, and many are unreached – without access to the gospel.

    Of the over 20 million people in Syria (the vast majority of whom are Muslim), nearly 7.5 million are unreached. These unreached people span across 18 distinct people groups, people groups who may now be found in Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Iraq, and Europe.

    All of this has a few huge implications for missions:

    1. Those hardest to reach with the good news remain in Syria. With the Islamic State taking over, people who remain are either silently hurting at their hands or complicit. “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Tim 1:15), so to sinners we must go.
    2. Whether in Syria or abroad, Christians are being persecuted. The Islamic State violently opposes all who don’t agree with their religious convictions, especially Christians. Believers still in Syria are likely to be on the run, anxiously hiding, or suffering abuse. Believers who have fled Syria are often homeless, unemployed, lacking basic needs, separated from family, and still religiously restricted… unfortunately, Iraq, Egypt, Turkey, and Jordan (the top destinations of Syrian exiles) are all also on the World Watch List. As fellow members of the body of Christ, we suffer when they do. Our love for them is evidence of our love for God and a testimony to the gospel for a watching world (1 Jn 4:7, Jn 13:35).
    3. Those displaced are uniquely situated to hear the gospel. For displaced unbelievers, not only are they more accessible than they would have been in Syria, but they’re also potentially more receptive to the message of Christ. They may be disenchanted with Islam (Daniel Abraham explained this clearly today on Tim Challies’ blog), they might be thinking more about eternity, and their awareness of their need for a Savior may be heightened.

    As is often the case, the church hurts worst in the world’s darkest spots. As we look to Syria and see our believing brothers and sisters suffering and fleeing, let’s not be guilty of indifference. Let’s pray for them, support them, and advocate on their behalf, knowing that helping the Syrian church continue to shine brightly is one of the greatest services we can do for the dark world around it. Syrians today need the light of Jesus more than ever. So let’s also bring the good news of forgiveness and reconciliation to those who presently oppose God.

    The people of Syria are in dire need. May we rise to the occasion.

  2. Content to Send. Longing to Go.

    Posted on June 23rd, 2015 by Radical

    This message was delivered by David Platt at CROSS 2015. In it, he shares his own personal longing to go to the unreached while urging all believers to give their lives for the spread of the gospel among the unreached. Below are his three main points:

    • Surrender to Christ regardless of the cost.
    • Abide in Christ and follow where He leads.
    • Trust in Christ, for He is the great reward.
  3. What’s Really Going On as Funeral Pyres Blaze in Nepal

    Posted on May 7th, 2015 by Jonathan

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    With the death toll at well over 7,000 people and climbing, the tragic scale of the earthquake in Nepal is hard to put into words. Perhaps the sadness is more effectively captured in this vivid account of the continually blazing Katmandu funeral pyres than it is in a quantitative catalogue of casualties. Here’s a heartbreaking excerpt:

    The family of Usha Shrestha gathered along the banks of the Bagmati River on Monday to bear her body down to the funeral pyres.

    They carried her on a stretcher fashioned from green bamboo, her body wrapped in a lavender flowered sheet, a red-and-gold sari and a marigold cloth written with God’s name.

    They dusted her with red powder and placed small, crumpled bills atop her chest. They laid her jewelry over her heart, roughly two days after it stopped beating.

    A professional body burner stacked logs of sal wood, a teak-like timber, onto a small platform and laid packets of ghee, a clarified butter, amid the timbers to ensure the flames would take light. One by one, her three sons prostrated themselves at her feet, their weeping uncontained by the surgical masks stretched across their faces.

    Then the eldest son performed the ultimate filial duty, laying a flaming stick upon his mother’s lips.

    As the flames spread across her chest, the body burner heaped straw atop her corpse, sending bluish smoke billowing into the sky over the white stupas of the Pashupatinath temple.

    Since Saturday evening, when the 45-year-old widow was crushed in her home by Nepal’s massive 7.8 earthquake, Hindu funeral pyres have been burning here almost around the clock. As of mid-Monday, nearly 300 bodies had been cremated, authorities at the temple said, more than six times the normal rate of roughly 15 to 20 per day. (The Chicago Tribune)

    The report goes on to relate the perspective of a professional body burner in Katmandu. Though devastatingly sad, you should read the rest of it. And as you read it, be reminded of what is really going on as the funeral pyres smoke and smolder. David Platt was reminded of it during a visit there a couple of years ago:

    I stood at the Bagmati River in South Asia where every day funerals are held and bodies are burned. It is the custom among these Hindu people when family or friends die to take their bodies within twenty-four hours to the river, where they lay them on funeral pyres and set the pyres ablaze. In so doing, they believe they are helping their friend of family member in the cycle of reincarnation. As I saw this scene before me, I stood in overwhelmed silence. For as I watched these flames overtake the bodies, I knew based on Scripture that I was witnessing at that moment a physical reflection of an eternal reality. Tears streamed down my face as I realized that most if not all of the people I was watching burn had died without ever hearing the good news of how they could have lived forever with God. (Counter Culture, 248-249)

    As we look to Nepal, may we bear in mind the eternal state of souls who die without Christ. To only meet their needs with water, shelter, and medical attention is a travesty of a remedy. Without the gospel, the flames of funeral pyres are not the only fires that Nepal’s dead will face.

    Hear David Platt address the current situation in Nepal on the latest Radical Together podcast episode: A Christ-Compelled Response to Nepal.

  4. 1 Comment

    Session 4 Highlights for Secret Church 15

    Posted on April 25th, 2015 by David Burnette

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    In the final session, Session 4, David Platt covers ethnicity & immigration, liberty and persecution, the injustice of the lack of gospel access among the unreached, and the ultimate hope of the believer–a new heaven and a new earth.

    ETHNICITY AND IMMIGRATION

    1 Key Passage:

    “And when he had taken the scroll, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb, each holding a harp, and golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of the saints. And they sang a new song, saying, “Worthy are you to take the scroll and to open its seals, for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation, and you have made them a kingdom and priests to our God, and they shall reign on the earth.” (Revelation 5:8-10)

     2 Memorable Quotes:

    “My barber in the Caribbean looks just like me. You’d think he was an African-American until he opens his mouth. When he speaks, he speaks Jamaican patois so it is clear that he’s not an African-American. My administrative assistant is also proudly Jamaican—very white-skinned. The lady in my barbershop looks a lot like my wife. You might think she is African-American or even Caymanian. She is Honduran. This notion of artificially imposing categories on people according to color—biology—is sheer folly. It’s an impossibility. This is why much of the field on race and ethnicity has largely abandoned the attempt to identify men based on biological categories of race.” (Thabiti Anyabwile)

    “As citizens of an other-worldly kingdom, we care for all people (regardless of ethnicity or status) in this ever-changing country.” (David Platt)

     3 Brief Takeaways:

    • The category of ethnicity is more helpful and biblical than the category of race as we pursue diversity.
    • God has promised to bless all peoples, and this blessing comes through Christ’s death.
    • There should be unity among God’s people for the sake of his glory in the world.

     

    LIBERTY AND PERSECUTION

    1 Key Passage:

    “Be subject for the Lord’s sake to every human institution, whether it be to the emperor as supreme, or to governors as sent by him to punish those who do evil and to praise those who do good. For this is the will of God, that by doing good you should put to silence the ignorance of foolish people. Live as people who are free, not using your freedom as a cover-up for evil, but living as servants of God. Honor everyone. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the emperor.” (1 Peter 2:13-17)

     2 Memorable Quotes:

    “When force is applied, the will is not aroused. One can enter the Church unwillingly, one can approach the altar unwillingly, one can receive the sacrament unwillingly; no one can believe except willingly.” Augustine

    “Freedom of religion is ultimately given by God, no just granted by government.” (David Platt)

    3 Brief Takeaways:

    • Religious liberty is not primarily a political issue, but rather a gospel issue.
    • We obey our government unless it requires us to disobey God.
    • Followers of Christ should speak and serve on behalf of the persecuted church around the world.

     

    THE GREATEST INJUSTICE OF ALL (THE UNREACHED)

    1 Key Passage:

    I am under obligation both to Greeks and to barbarians, both to the wise and to the foolish. That is why I am so eager to preach the gospel also to you who are at Rome. I am not ashamed of the gospel, because it is the power of God for the salvation of everyone who believes, first for the Jew, and then for the Gentile. (Romans 1:14-16)

    2 Memorable Quotes:

    “God alone knows the definition of terms [here]. I cannot precisely define who all the nations are, but I do not need to know. I know only one thing: Christ has not yet returned; therefore, the task is not yet done. When it is done, Christ will come. Our responsibility is not to insist on defining the terms; our responsibility is to complete the task. So long as Christ does not return, our work is undone. Let us get busy and complete our mission.” (George Ladd on Matthew 24:14)

    “The beauty of the gospel creates a burden for mission.” (David Platt)

    3 Brief Takeaways:

    • For the unreached, their current knowledge of God is only enough to damn them to hell.
    • The plan of God warrants the sacrifices of his people, and the Son of God deserves the praise of all peoples.
    • We as Christians live to reach people from among all peoples for the praise of God, whether by praying, giving, and/or going.

     

    THE ULTIMATE HOPE FOR ALL

    1 Key Passage:

    “Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” (Revelation 21:1-4)

    2 Memorable Quotes:

    “If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.” (C.S. Lewis)

    “To come to Thee is to come home from exile, to come to land out of the raging storm, to come to rest after long labor, to come to the goal of my desires and the summit of my wishes.” (Charles Spurgeon)

    3 Brief Takeaways:

    • For the unreached, their current knowledge of God is only enough to damn them to hell.
    • The plan of God warrants the sacrifices of his people, and the Son of God deserves the praise of all peoples.
    • We as Christians live to reach people from among all peoples for the praise of God through our praying, giving, and going.
  5. 2 Comments

    Secret Church 15 – What Are We Exporting?

    Posted on March 18th, 2015 by Jonathan

    This year’s Secret Church topic will touch on abortion, immigration, same-sex marriage, pornography, racism, and more. So here’s the question: will it have any relevance outside America’s borders?

    The Secret Church simulcast is international. Participants in countries around the world will be joining us on April 24. But it’s also more than that. One of our goals for Secret Church is to produce biblically sound teaching that we can translate into other languages, and thereby equip believers in churches overseas. In fact, we want Secret Church to be useful for believers in the very areas we highlight and pray for at our annual gathering… areas filled with ignorance of and opposition to the gospel.

    So how does this year’s topic square with our aim of translating the teaching and equipping the church abroad? It seems that Christ, Culture, and a Call to Action simply dives into the American political conversation by taking on “hot buttons” that frequent our American news cycles. Is there any way that Vietnamese Christians could find teaching on racism helpful in their context? Or could the underground church in Saudi Arabia possibly benefit from an Arabic translation of how we American Christians ought to respond to same-sex marriage court rulings?

    There’s a clearer link than it may seem. Part of the Great Commission to make disciples of all nations including “teaching them to observe all that [Jesus has] commanded.” We cannot be faithful to the mission of God and neglect the full counsel of his Word. So when the Bible is clear, we must be too, even if a particular issue seems less relevant in certain cultural contexts.

    On top of that, currently at the forefront of Christian higher education, America sends out thousands of missionaries. For the sake of gospel advance among unreached people groups, we need to get our theology right. If, for example, the American church decided that there was nothing wrong with abortion, the churches abroad that we help plant and train would likely also learn to devalue image-bearers of God in one way or another. Or take sexual sin. We can’t genuinely equip believers to combat sex trafficking overseas if we’re okay with pornography at home, because (aside from direct links between the two in many cases) the truth of the gospel should lead us to reject all sexual immorality: we are the bride of Christ!

    In other words, any issue that’s a gospel issue is worth teaching. All these controversial “political” positions are actually gospel issues, and that is alway relevant. The specific application may differ from culture to culture, just as our application of truth in Paul’s epistles differs from that of the churches Paul was writing to. But gospel truth is always instructive.

    The issues at hand in Christ, Culture, and a Call to Action may have more global relevance than you realized. For the sake of secret churches everywhere, we can’t afford not to speak up.

  6. Drop Box, Racism, Parenting, ISIS Motives, Unreached

    Posted on March 6th, 2015 by Jonathan

    Drop Box: Following the ministry of a South Korean pastor, this extremely well done documentary film powerfully depicts the sanctity of life and shows why Christians should care for orphans.

    How NOT To Be a Racist: This thoughtful piece by Bryan Lorrits gets at the heart of the racial divide that still exists in our country. “Those who confine themselves to their own culture, and never come out to richly taste and engage in others will unfortunately remain completely unaware to life’s not so sweet realities, and in the process will become unaware of themselves.”

    Parenting Means Wrestling Demons: Proclaiming biblical truth with the anecdotes of experience, Jonathan Parnell reminds us that while Jesus loves the little children of the world, Satan hates them. “If we go into the work of parenting with a Precious Moments romanticism, it won’t be long before despair sets in. It’s just too hard if we think it’s going to be easy. It’s essential to know, especially when the going gets tough, that we are fighting hell.”

    ISIS Isn’t About Jobs: “ISIS is being as provocative as it can be precisely because it wants to bring about the end of days according to its understanding of Islamic teaching.” Rob Schwarzwalder then illuminates why the response of Western leadership is, in many ways, impeded due to their denial and/or misunderstanding of ISIS’s religious motivations. “Secularists simply have great difficulty grasping that religion actually motivates behavior.”

    Why Do We Plant Churches Among the Unreached?: The first of a series of posts titled 3 Ways Engaging Other Nations Brings More Glory to God, Kevin Peck clearly sets the stage with a clear and concise explanation of the biblical call to cross-cultural missions. “From Genesis 1 to Genesis 12:2 to the Prophets to the Great Commission we can see God declaring His glory through His people to all nations. God’s economy is founded on his blessing of a people who will become a blessing, so that others may glorify him.”

  7. The Secret Church Prayer Focus

    Posted on January 12th, 2015 by Jonathan

    If, in the busyness of the holiday season, you missed our announcement last month, the Secret Church 15 prayer focus is the Peoples of Vietnam.

    If you’re new to Secret Church, that may leave you with more questions than answers. So to learn what exactly the prayer focus is, watch the two minute video below. You can also explore the prayer focus websites from last year or the year before that.

    As the video explained, it’s more than a few minutes on the night of Secret Church. After Secret Church, we’ll be devoting the entire month of May to focused prayer for Vietnam, so now is the time to begin thinking and praying about how you can encourage your church or small group to pray for the Peoples of Vietnam.

  8. Distinguishing Between “Lost” and “Unreached”

    Posted on January 8th, 2015 by Jonathan

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    It may seem like we’re splitting hairs to differentiate between “lost” and “unreached,” but we aren’t.

    In a previous post, we discussed unreached peoples, who they are, and what it practically means to be unreached. The definition we gave for unreached was: “people groups among whom there is no indigenous community of believing Christians able to engage the people group with church planting.” In describing what it would mean to be in an unreached people group (UPG), David Platt illuminates the one factor that makes a UPG different than merely being lost:

    You don’t have access to the gospel. And this is key; this is why we don’t say, Well, I don’t know why we talk about unreached people around the world when there are unreached people who work at my office. Not true. Those people aren’t unreached. Why? Because they have access to the gospel. You are their access to the gospel!

    The people who don’t know Christ at your office are lost. For the salvation of their souls, they must respond to the gospel with repentance and faith. But because you are in their life (and, presumably, so are other Christians), they are not unreached.

    While an individual can’t be more or less lost (you either know Jesus or you don’t), an individual can have more or less access to the gospel. For this reason, we talk about UPGs a lot.

    We should always be sensitive to the lost, having eternity in our eyes and the good news on our lips. But when there are over 6,500 UPGSs comprised of at least 2 billion individual people… it’s safe to say that the unreached deserve our urgent attention.

  9. 4 Comments

    Who Are The Unreached?

    Posted on January 6th, 2015 by Radical

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    There are 48 unreached people groups in Vietnam (the Secret Church 15 prayer focus) comprised of 89,160,250 individuals. Of those 48 people groups, 24 are unengaged. Below, David Platt helps us understand just what it means to be unreached . . .

    Who are the unreached in our day? Who are the people who have never heard?

    The unreached are people groups among whom there is no indigenous community of believing Christians able to engage the people group with church planting. Now you’ll notice in that definition the term “people group.” And just to remind you what that means . . .

    When Jesus commanded the church to make disciples of all the nations, the word he used for nations there is “ethnē,” from which we get words like “ethnic groups.” And this is important, because when Jesus was talking about nations there in Matthew 28:19, he wasn’t referring to nations like we think of nations today – 200 or so geopolitical nations in the world that, quite frankly, didn’t exist 2000 years ago, when Jesus said this, in the way they do now. No, Jesus is specifically talking about ethnic groups: groups of people that share common cultural and language characteristics. And among 200 nations today, there are a plethora of people groupings.

    And not just among nations, but in cities. We had a group of church members who recently went into our city to make connections with different people groups represented here, and they went to international restaurants and markets, community centers and college campuses, where they met Thai, Filipino, Vietnamese, Punjabi, Gujarati, Colombian, Salvadoran, Palestinian Arab, Jordanian Arab, Northern Yemeni Arab, and Moroccan Arab people, just to name a few! And that’s in Birmingham, AL, hardly the most cosmopolitan city in the world.

    So think about 200 nations filled with a diverse array of peoples. Most anthropologists and missiological scholars say there are over 11,000 different people groups. So unreached peoples, then, are people groups who don’t have “an indigenous community of believing Christians” – and what that means is that there is not a church made up of men and women from that people that is sufficient to engage that people with the gospel . . . that has enough presence to make the gospel known among that people.

    Technically speaking, when we say “unreached,” we’re saying that the percentage of evangelical Christians in this people group is less than 2%. And why that’s important is because what that means is that if there’s not a substantial church presence among a people, then not only do over 98% of the people not believe the gospel, but because there’s no church around them, and no Christians among them, then most of them have never even met a Christian (i.e., a person who would share the gospel with them). They are “unreached.” Most (if not almost all) of the people in that people group have not been reached by a Christian . . . and Christ has not been named/preached among them.

    So how many people are unreached in the world today? And our best estimate is that out of over 11,000 distinct people groups, over 6,500 people groups are unreached. Over 6,500 are classified as unreached according to the definition above. And just to make sure we feel the weight of that number of people groups, 6,500 people groups includes at least 2 billion individual people. So we’re talking in a world of 7 billion people, at least 2 billion of them are unreached—2 billion people who’ve still not been reached with the gospel of Christ.

    And just to put one more term on the table – “unengaged.” Over 3,000 of these 6,500 people groups are also unengaged, meaning there is currently no evangelical church planting strategy underway to reach that people group. And those people groups include around 200 million individual people. So in many cases (not in all, but many), these are smaller people groups that don’t comprise large swaths of people, but they still have distinct ethnicity and many times language. I was spending some time recently with a group of missionaries from the International Mission Board . . . and these missionaries were working to reach people groups who still have had no contact whatsoever with the outside – living in total isolation.

    Now what was encouraging was that there were people working to get the gospel to them. What is overwhelming is to think that, right now, there’s at least 3,000 people groups (many of which are smaller ethnic groups), that have no one specifically trying to reach them with the gospel. There’s only one thing worse than being lost; that’s being lost and having no one try to find you.

    Now all these numbers of unreached and unengaged can feel distant. That’s the way numbers and statistics work. So, practically, what does it mean to be unreached? . . . I want you to put yourself in the shoes of one of these two billion people in the world who are unreached.

    So imagine you, your family, or your kids – so not two billion, but one or two or three or four of you – if you are unreached, practically, that means that you do not currently have access to the gospel. In other words, you likely don’t even know it exists. Either, like some people I have met in the world, you have never even heard the name of Jesus: “Jesus . . . who’s that?” Or, you’ve heard of Jesus, but you know as much about Him as you know about Confucius: “I think he taught on personal and governmental philosophy, maybe . . . and had influence on Eastern thinking . . .” But that’s about all you know. And you don’t know any Christian. You don’t know anyone who knows the truth about Christ. You’ve never met anyone who knows the truth about Christ . . .

    If you’re unreached, it means you don’t have access to Christians, to truth about what Christ has done, and unless something changes, you will likely be born, live, and die without ever hearing the gospel. That’s what we’re talking about practically – people who, if they die today (so put yourself in their shoes . . . if you die today and you are in their shoes, you) will die likely never having heard the good news of what God has done in Christ.

    From David Platt in Our Obligation to the Unreached (Part 1), August 2014
    Additional Resources: PeopleGroups.org and JoshuaProject.net
    Secret Church 15 info: Christ, Culture, and a Call to Action

     

  10. Being More About Missions in 2015 . . . Practically

    Posted on December 29th, 2014 by Jonathan

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    Most of us would do well to be more involved in global missions. But it simply won’t do to make a New Year’s resolution to “be more missional” . . . you are likely already well aware that you should be praying more, giving more, and/or going more. Knowing how to do these things is another matter, and not knowing where to begin can leave you feeling overwhelmed and discouraged.

    So, below are several starting points. The list is not meant to be exhaustive, but practical and manageable. It may even get you thinking about other ways you can be more about the Great Commission.

    Write a Missionary Every Month
    There is little more encouraging to missionaries than genuine interest in their ministry from friends and family back home. When you take the time to sit down and ask them how they are doing, update them on what’s new with you, share what God is teaching you, and tell them how you are praying for them, your care is evident. You, too, will be blessed, encouraged, and challenged by this practice. Though emails are good, an occasional hand-written letter is a nice touch. And every so often, send a care package.

    Educate Yourself on Regions of the World
    Choose different areas of the world to learn about and pray for. The regions could be big (ex: Siberia) or small (ex: Lebanon), and you can shift your focus once a month, twice a month, or once a quarter. Learn about the area’s people groups, culture, government, economy, and history. Make it a family activity, and have fun with it. You can prepare a meal common to the region, listen the its traditional music, or play a game/sport that originates there. As you begin to appreciate the area’s people and culture, you will see it as less of an abstract shape on a map and more of a real place with real people who have real physical and spiritual needs.

    Serve International Students at a Nearby College
    It’s often surprising how many people groups are present when you look around you. What might be more surprising is the large number of them who are never invited into an American home. Try seeking them out. You might go to ethnic restaurants, markets, or other places where they gather, but one of the most natural channels is through your local college or university. Many of them have sizable populations of international students who are studying abroad in America, and some them even have programs set up to connect them to Americans. Ask if there’s any way you can get involved.

    Organize a Fundraiser
    The less missionaries have to worry about sustaining themselves, the more they can focus on the work at hand. Consider organizing a car wash, a tournament, a garage sale, or some other creative method of raising money for a missionary family, organization, or church fund. Whether or not you already give, a world missions fundraiser has several benefits. 1) They can be effective ways to quickly raise and give more money than a small group of individuals can give on their own. 2) Fundraisers also raise awareness – among both the people giving and the people you recruit to help put it on. This can often be more valuable than any monetary gain. 3) Going out of your way to set up a fundraiser helps create solidarity with missionaries in the field while greatly encouraging them at the same time.

    Serve Missionaries on Furlough
    If your church has commissioned missionaries, ask your church leaders if and when they’ll be returning on furlough, and find out what their needs are. Do they need a place to stay for a couple of months? Do they need a car? A cell phone? Once you know what their practical needs are, see if there’s anything you can do to help meet them, even sacrificially.

    Pray for the Persecuted
    Many of you already pray for unreached people groups with the help of resources like PeopleGroups.org, Operation World, or Joshua Project. As you continue this, remember that proclamation of the gospel to the least reached is often accompanied by opposition and persecution. Learn of specific ways to begin praying for persecuted Christians and the ones imposing it on them with the help of Open Doors or Voice of the Martyrs.