Posts Tagged ‘unreached’

  1. The Secret Church Prayer Focus

    Posted on January 12th, 2015 by Jonathan

    If, in the busyness of the holiday season, you missed our announcement last month, the Secret Church 15 prayer focus is the Peoples of Vietnam.

    If you’re new to Secret Church, that may leave you with more questions than answers. So to learn what exactly the prayer focus is, watch the two minute video below. You can also explore the prayer focus websites from last year or the year before that.

    As the video explained, it’s more than a few minutes on the night of Secret Church. After Secret Church, we’ll be devoting the entire month of May to focused prayer for Vietnam, so now is the time to begin thinking and praying about how you can encourage your church or small group to pray for the Peoples of Vietnam.

  2. Distinguishing Between “Lost” and “Unreached”

    Posted on January 8th, 2015 by Jonathan

    file0001183334419

    It may seem like we’re splitting hairs to differentiate between “lost” and “unreached,” but we aren’t.

    In a previous post, we discussed unreached peoples, who they are, and what it practically means to be unreached. The definition we gave for unreached was: “people groups among whom there is no indigenous community of believing Christians able to engage the people group with church planting.” In describing what it would mean to be in an unreached people group (UPG), David Platt illuminates the one factor that makes a UPG different than merely being lost:

    You don’t have access to the gospel. And this is key; this is why we don’t say, Well, I don’t know why we talk about unreached people around the world when there are unreached people who work at my office. Not true. Those people aren’t unreached. Why? Because they have access to the gospel. You are their access to the gospel!

    The people who don’t know Christ at your office are lost. For the salvation of their souls, they must respond to the gospel with repentance and faith. But because you are in their life (and, presumably, so are other Christians), they are not unreached.

    While an individual can’t be more or less lost (you either know Jesus or you don’t), an individual can have more or less access to the gospel. For this reason, we talk about UPGs a lot.

    We should always be sensitive to the lost, having eternity in our eyes and the good news on our lips. But when there are over 6,500 UPGSs comprised of at least 2 billion individual people… it’s safe to say that the unreached deserve our urgent attention.

  3. 4 Comments

    Who Are The Unreached?

    Posted on January 6th, 2015 by Radical

    peid33474_pg

    There are 48 unreached people groups in Vietnam (the Secret Church 15 prayer focus) comprised of 89,160,250 individuals. Of those 48 people groups, 24 are unengaged. Below, David Platt helps us understand just what it means to be unreached . . .

    Who are the unreached in our day? Who are the people who have never heard?

    The unreached are people groups among whom there is no indigenous community of believing Christians able to engage the people group with church planting. Now you’ll notice in that definition the term “people group.” And just to remind you what that means . . .

    When Jesus commanded the church to make disciples of all the nations, the word he used for nations there is “ethnē,” from which we get words like “ethnic groups.” And this is important, because when Jesus was talking about nations there in Matthew 28:19, he wasn’t referring to nations like we think of nations today – 200 or so geopolitical nations in the world that, quite frankly, didn’t exist 2000 years ago, when Jesus said this, in the way they do now. No, Jesus is specifically talking about ethnic groups: groups of people that share common cultural and language characteristics. And among 200 nations today, there are a plethora of people groupings.

    And not just among nations, but in cities. We had a group of church members who recently went into our city to make connections with different people groups represented here, and they went to international restaurants and markets, community centers and college campuses, where they met Thai, Filipino, Vietnamese, Punjabi, Gujarati, Colombian, Salvadoran, Palestinian Arab, Jordanian Arab, Northern Yemeni Arab, and Moroccan Arab people, just to name a few! And that’s in Birmingham, AL, hardly the most cosmopolitan city in the world.

    So think about 200 nations filled with a diverse array of peoples. Most anthropologists and missiological scholars say there are over 11,000 different people groups. So unreached peoples, then, are people groups who don’t have “an indigenous community of believing Christians” – and what that means is that there is not a church made up of men and women from that people that is sufficient to engage that people with the gospel . . . that has enough presence to make the gospel known among that people.

    Technically speaking, when we say “unreached,” we’re saying that the percentage of evangelical Christians in this people group is less than 2%. And why that’s important is because what that means is that if there’s not a substantial church presence among a people, then not only do over 98% of the people not believe the gospel, but because there’s no church around them, and no Christians among them, then most of them have never even met a Christian (i.e., a person who would share the gospel with them). They are “unreached.” Most (if not almost all) of the people in that people group have not been reached by a Christian . . . and Christ has not been named/preached among them.

    So how many people are unreached in the world today? And our best estimate is that out of over 11,000 distinct people groups, over 6,500 people groups are unreached. Over 6,500 are classified as unreached according to the definition above. And just to make sure we feel the weight of that number of people groups, 6,500 people groups includes at least 2 billion individual people. So we’re talking in a world of 7 billion people, at least 2 billion of them are unreached—2 billion people who’ve still not been reached with the gospel of Christ.

    And just to put one more term on the table – “unengaged.” Over 3,000 of these 6,500 people groups are also unengaged, meaning there is currently no evangelical church planting strategy underway to reach that people group. And those people groups include around 200 million individual people. So in many cases (not in all, but many), these are smaller people groups that don’t comprise large swaths of people, but they still have distinct ethnicity and many times language. I was spending some time recently with a group of missionaries from the International Mission Board . . . and these missionaries were working to reach people groups who still have had no contact whatsoever with the outside – living in total isolation.

    Now what was encouraging was that there were people working to get the gospel to them. What is overwhelming is to think that, right now, there’s at least 3,000 people groups (many of which are smaller ethnic groups), that have no one specifically trying to reach them with the gospel. There’s only one thing worse than being lost; that’s being lost and having no one try to find you.

    Now all these numbers of unreached and unengaged can feel distant. That’s the way numbers and statistics work. So, practically, what does it mean to be unreached? . . . I want you to put yourself in the shoes of one of these two billion people in the world who are unreached.

    So imagine you, your family, or your kids – so not two billion, but one or two or three or four of you – if you are unreached, practically, that means that you do not currently have access to the gospel. In other words, you likely don’t even know it exists. Either, like some people I have met in the world, you have never even heard the name of Jesus: “Jesus . . . who’s that?” Or, you’ve heard of Jesus, but you know as much about Him as you know about Confucius: “I think he taught on personal and governmental philosophy, maybe . . . and had influence on Eastern thinking . . .” But that’s about all you know. And you don’t know any Christian. You don’t know anyone who knows the truth about Christ. You’ve never met anyone who knows the truth about Christ . . .

    If you’re unreached, it means you don’t have access to Christians, to truth about what Christ has done, and unless something changes, you will likely be born, live, and die without ever hearing the gospel. That’s what we’re talking about practically – people who, if they die today (so put yourself in their shoes . . . if you die today and you are in their shoes, you) will die likely never having heard the good news of what God has done in Christ.

    From David Platt in Our Obligation to the Unreached (Part 1), August 2014
    Additional Resources: PeopleGroups.org and JoshuaProject.net
    Secret Church 15 info: Christ, Culture, and a Call to Action

     

  4. Being More About Missions in 2015 . . . Practically

    Posted on December 29th, 2014 by Jonathan

    3CoEETpvQYO8x60lnZSA_rue

    Most of us would do well to be more involved in global missions. But it simply won’t do to make a New Year’s resolution to “be more missional” . . . you are likely already well aware that you should be praying more, giving more, and/or going more. Knowing how to do these things is another matter, and not knowing where to begin can leave you feeling overwhelmed and discouraged.

    So, below are several starting points. The list is not meant to be exhaustive, but practical and manageable. It may even get you thinking about other ways you can be more about the Great Commission.

    Write a Missionary Every Month
    There is little more encouraging to missionaries than genuine interest in their ministry from friends and family back home. When you take the time to sit down and ask them how they are doing, update them on what’s new with you, share what God is teaching you, and tell them how you are praying for them, your care is evident. You, too, will be blessed, encouraged, and challenged by this practice. Though emails are good, an occasional hand-written letter is a nice touch. And every so often, send a care package.

    Educate Yourself on Regions of the World
    Choose different areas of the world to learn about and pray for. The regions could be big (ex: Siberia) or small (ex: Lebanon), and you can shift your focus once a month, twice a month, or once a quarter. Learn about the area’s people groups, culture, government, economy, and history. Make it a family activity, and have fun with it. You can prepare a meal common to the region, listen the its traditional music, or play a game/sport that originates there. As you begin to appreciate the area’s people and culture, you will see it as less of an abstract shape on a map and more of a real place with real people who have real physical and spiritual needs.

    Serve International Students at a Nearby College
    It’s often surprising how many people groups are present when you look around you. What might be more surprising is the large number of them who are never invited into an American home. Try seeking them out. You might go to ethnic restaurants, markets, or other places where they gather, but one of the most natural channels is through your local college or university. Many of them have sizable populations of international students who are studying abroad in America, and some them even have programs set up to connect them to Americans. Ask if there’s any way you can get involved.

    Organize a Fundraiser
    The less missionaries have to worry about sustaining themselves, the more they can focus on the work at hand. Consider organizing a car wash, a tournament, a garage sale, or some other creative method of raising money for a missionary family, organization, or church fund. Whether or not you already give, a world missions fundraiser has several benefits. 1) They can be effective ways to quickly raise and give more money than a small group of individuals can give on their own. 2) Fundraisers also raise awareness – among both the people giving and the people you recruit to help put it on. This can often be more valuable than any monetary gain. 3) Going out of your way to set up a fundraiser helps create solidarity with missionaries in the field while greatly encouraging them at the same time.

    Serve Missionaries on Furlough
    If your church has commissioned missionaries, ask your church leaders if and when they’ll be returning on furlough, and find out what their needs are. Do they need a place to stay for a couple of months? Do they need a car? A cell phone? Once you know what their practical needs are, see if there’s anything you can do to help meet them, even sacrificially.

    Pray for the Persecuted
    Many of you already pray for unreached people groups with the help of resources like PeopleGroups.org, Operation World, or Joshua Project. As you continue this, remember that proclamation of the gospel to the least reached is often accompanied by opposition and persecution. Learn of specific ways to begin praying for persecuted Christians and the ones imposing it on them with the help of Open Doors or Voice of the Martyrs.

  5. Your Role in Sending

    Posted on October 22nd, 2014 by David Burnette

    David Platt encourages you to consider how you might be involved in reaching those who have never heard the gospel, whether that’s by going or giving. Reaching the unreached is at the heart of the mission of the IMB.

    Stay tuned in the upcoming weeks and months as we highlight a number of practical and creative ways you can participate in giving. Your giving will go directly to help support IMB workers who are taking the gospel to the ends of the earth. You can give by going here.

  6. Correctly Using a Good, Helpful, Biblical Category

    Posted on October 21st, 2014 by Jonathan

    p10201_01_ot_pg

    If you’ve ever taken a vegan friend to lunch, chances are your first suggestion was not Whataburger. You probably stayed away from all restaurants the fell under the “fast food hamburger joints” category. But not only did knowing your restaurant categories prove to be helpful; so did knowing the category your friend fell into – “vegan.” When used correctly, categories are good and helpful tools.

    People Groups

    One category that Jesus makes use of is ethne, translated “nations” in the Great Commission –  “make disciples of all ethne.” This command drives us to go and steers us toward our many destinations: the ethne of the world. But ethne doesn’t refer to nation-states such as Uganda, India, or China. Rather, it refers to categories of people (people groups) such as the Seminole Nation, the Yazidis, or the Kurds. Our desire to fully obey this command has led us to identify who these people groups are, and then to prioritize the ones that have little to no believers among them – unreached people groups (UPGs). We have a clear aim.

    Categorizing people into groups doesn’t just give us an aim, though; it assists us in attaining it. Knowing a person’s specific people group can help you prepare to share the gospel with him or her by indicating language, cultural customs, religious beliefs, social norms, assumptions, values, and more. The good news cannot spread where there is no understanding, and people group categories help us find some common ground so we can meet them where they are.

    For example, let’s suppose you meet an Afghan woman. Knowing that her Afghan people group is unreached, you decide to go out of your way to share the gospel with her. Based on her people group, you infer that she speaks Dari, practices Islam, is offended by women in shorts, and doesn’t talk directly to men. So you learn a few Dari words, study the basics of Islam, make sure you’re modestly dressed, and make sure there’s no one-on-one situation with a male.

    People Groups and the People that Comprise Them

    But what if the Afghan woman’s parents immigrated to America shortly after she was born and she grew up in the California public school system? Will she feel that you cared more about her than her Afghan-ness? Does your preparation allow you enough flexibility to still be an effective witness?

    What if people don’t always fit their people group mold?

    We must remember that individuals are not people groups. Though people from within the same group will necessarily share some characteristics, they won’t necessarily share all characteristics. In fact, chances are, you’ll find a whole gamut of differences within each group. Our mission is still clear: to make disciples of all of the people groups. And these people groups give us a huge jump start in knowing about a person so as to communicate with them well. But as we seek to share the gospel with individuals, we must learn to use people group categories as guiding tools rather than hard line rules.

    I have an Iranian friend named Ali. He came to the United States as a student in engineering. One night, a close friend and I were talking with him, and we began to steer the conversation toward spiritual things. I thought I knew how it would go: What do you believe? Islam? Great, let’s talk about the difference between Islam and Christianity. To my surprise, not only was Ali not Muslim… he was more interested in finding out where American guys go to meet American girls. In fact, according to him, the Iranian government was far more Muslim than the people they governed. He shared a heart language and cultural identity with the Persian people of Iran, but not the majority religious belief.

    Again, categories – including people groups – are good and helpful tools to utilize… when they are used correctly.

    There are more than 11,000 people groups, and well over half of them are unreached. Though the Great Commission demands we make disciples among each of them, we ought to be careful not to approach individuals mechanically with regard only to who their people group says they are supposed to be. In the end, all ethne will be represented around God’s throne in heaven. And the representatives will all be unique individuals. May our ministry reflect both these truths.

    Additional Resources

    WEBSITES: People Groups and Joshua Project

    SERMON: Our Obligation to the Unreached, Part 1 (and Part 2), David Platt

    BOOK: Let The Nations Be Glad (and related resources), John Piper

  7. How One Church is Engaging an Unreached People Group

    Posted on October 20th, 2014 by Jonathan

    20140606hj-0634-2__large169

    Nearly a quarter of a billion people live in the 29 countries that comprise Southeast Asia. The region hosts 426 people groups, 343 of which are unreached. If you’re one of the 215 million people in these unreached people groups (UPGs), chances are, you live your entire life without ever hearing the good news of Jesus. That’s a sort of despair with which most of us are unacquainted.

    However, one North Carolina church is at work in the region, hoping to change the situation for the “T people,” as they affectionately call them. There are only a handful of known believers among the T, a largely Buddhist UPG. Why are they unreached? IMB writer Paige Turner – who lives in Southeast Asia – explains:

    The problem lies in getting to these people. It isn’t easy. Few outsiders make it to the remote villages nestled in the steep, wet mountains of Southeast Asia.

    Just to tell this one Bible story about creation, Harrison [a pastor from the North Carolina church that is engaging the T] and several local believers ride 45 minutes in a three-wheeled motorcycle taxi, with little protection from the rain and wind. Along one road, the group walks while the taxi slowly maneuvers through the mud. Then, they ride motorcycles another 30 minutes straight up a mountain to the fishing village.

    The journey is even difficult for local residents to reach the remote villages. Khin and Thet [believers from a neighboring ethnic group] often walk three hours one-way during rainy season, when their motorcycle can’t make it up the mountain through the mud, to share the Gospel.

    Again, this is just one of 343 UPGs in Southeast Asia. Worldwide, it’s one of 6,565 . .  all of them without access to gospel. Though the reasons for these groups’ lack of gospel knowledge are varied, the fact they don’t have it should lead us to ask the same questions as Paul in Romans 10: “How will they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching? And how are they to peach unless they are sent?” (vv. 14,15).

    To read the whole story from which the above excerpt is pulled, click here. To learn more how your church can embrace an unreached people group like the T, click here.

  8. Mid-Term Field Report: “Because Jesus Is Worth It”

    Posted on September 24th, 2014 by Jonathan

    DSC00234

    Have you ever been “missing in action” when a loved one needed you? Karina has. And from her critter-infested home in Thailand, she can testify to the pain it causes . . . but she can also testify to the joy of loving and obeying Christ.

    Karina was sent out by The Church at Brook Hills to serve mid-term (anywhere between two months and two years), teaching English to kindergarteners. We hope that her example will encourage and challenge you to love Jesus far more than anything else. According to Karina, even though such love is sometimes hard, “Jesus is worth it.”

    Here’s what Karina had to say . . .

    _______________________________________

    What has been the most surprising aspect about serving in this new context?

    It never fails to surprise me just how many other creatures I share a home with. We’ve had infestations of ants, termites, geckos, mosquitos, roaches, tokays, snakes, lizards, spiders (anywhere from really small to as big as my face), snails and rats.

    What has been the most difficult part of your time there?

    The most difficult part is managing my classes. I teach anywhere from 27-39 students. That’s 39 three-year-olds. So to keep them all focused and on task is a bit challenging, to say the least.

    Can you give us your highlight of the trip?

    In April my mom and good friend were able to visit me. We were able to celebrate Songkran (the water throwing festival). It’s basically the ice bucket challenge all day for three days, and everyone plays. It’s the best festival ever.

    What advice would you give to people considering going mid-term?

    Go. And try to learn as much language beforehand.

    What advice would you give to friends, family, and church members in terms of how they can support workers like you?

    Please pray for us daily. I can’t say it enough. Pray, pray, pray, pray, pray. Also, little notes of encouragement are great too. It can get pretty lonely overseas, so it’s always a pleasant surprise to find a personal email waiting for you in your inbox.

    What is one big takeaway that the the Father has taught you in your experience as a mid-term worker?

    Luke 14:26 has really taken on a new meaning to me since being here. “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple.” I only thought I knew what that meant, but now I know what that means. Being a disciple of Jesus means missing weddings and baby showers of my dearest and oldest friends. It means being away from family in illness. It means missing birthdays, graduations, and other celebrations. It means people may not think you love them because you are away when they “need” you the most. And it’s hard. Especially on the rough days, and the enemy tempts you to think it’s not worth it. But it is worth it, because Jesus is worth it.

    What is one thing you have learned from the national brothers and sisters that you are partnering with?

    They are so selfless, generous, and some of the most joyous people I have ever met.  They don’t let their circumstances dictate their emotions. They may not have much, but they will sacrifice for you.

  9. John Piper Interviews David Platt

    Posted on September 18th, 2014 by Jonathan

    Several years ago, John Piper sat down with David Platt to ask him some questions about missions and his heart for the unreached. This 30 minute video gives a great glimpse into who David is and what he’s about.

    (HT: Desiring God)

  10. Mid-Term Field Report: “Utilize The Time”

    Posted on September 17th, 2014 by Jonathan

    As many of us are leaving summer behind to return to school or get back into a regular routine at work, Matt is doing no such thing. Life is different for him. Matt lives in Central Asia and was sent out to serve mid-term by The Church at Brook Hill. Mid-term is described as a period of anywhere between two months and two years. For him, school looks more like learning a foreign language, and monotonous routine . . . well, there’s not much of that.

    We asked Matt some questions about his life in Central Asia. Our hope is that his words might challenge those of us tempted to simply survive the next test or deadline. Our lives are intended for more than intention-less routines driven by purposeless attitudes. When we realize that God desires to use us to bring the nations to Himself, and when we hear of brothers and sisters whose devotion to Christ means harsh persecution, we see everything differently. The reality is, we have so much more to live for than the weekend.

    Here’s what Matt had to say . . .

    _______________________________________

    What has been the most surprising aspect about serving in this new context?

    Time and time again, my team and I have been surprised at how quickly God answers the prayers of us and our supporters back home, and His answers to these prayers are often even better than we knew to ask for! We shouldn’t be afraid to ask Him to act in big ways to help us reach lost people. He desires and is worthy of the worship of all peoples and is actively working in hearts and lives all across the world.

    What has been the most difficult part of your time there?

    It has been difficult being part of a new team re-engaging a minority people group that has not been worked with for several years. Due to the difficulty of gaining access to our people’s homeland, we are in the process of establishing a business in a nearby country where there is a significant population of our people. This poses many challenges such as learning a minority language with few immersion experiences, balancing business and ministry responsibilities, and justifying to the community why we as Western businessmen spend so much time with this minority people and are learning their language.

    Can you give us your highlight of the trip?

    One of the biggest highlights so far has been growing closer as a team and becoming more like a family.  Being part of such a small team, we spend a lot of time together, and the Lord has used that in teaching us more of what it means to be the body of Christ. Praying, worshiping, and having fun together, holding one another accountable, and being united in a common vision has helped us to encourage one another during the difficult times and overall thrive in our first year on the field.

    What advice would you give to people considering going mid-term?

    Utilize the time before you leave the U.S. to establish routines of engaging lost people where you are currently. Often times, we get caught up in enjoying the benefits of Christian community so much that we rarely put ourselves in places where we are surrounded by the lost. Going mid-term is a weird balance between a sprint and a marathon; the routines you are able to establish before arriving on the field will help you to make the most of the time you have in your new context.

    What advice would you give to friends, family, and church members in terms of how they can support workers like you?

    The way that is most obvious and yet often over-looked is to actively pray for that person, their ministry, and their people. Be proactive in asking for ways to pray for that person and in regularly praying for their boldness and evangelism opportunities. Also, we love hearing from friends, family, and supporters about what is happening back home and how we can be praying for them.

    What is one big takeaway that the the Father has taught you in your experience as a mid-term worker?

    I often feel like I am sitting on the front row watching Him prepare the harvest of these people in a way in which only the Creator of the universe is able! In our first month on the field, He answered our prayers by providing a language teacher, national believer, and friend all with a single person whom He had burdened to return to his family and country (at the risk of his life) to help reach his people with the gospel of Christ. The things we’ve seen happen over the past year are more than coincidences; no doubt the Lord is doing the same type of things in unreached people groups all across the world!

    What is one thing you have learned from the national brothers and sisters that you are partnering with?

    Extreme persecution is normal, expected, and worth the risk for the believers in this part of the world. Coming from a place, like the U.S, where it is “safe” to be a Christian, it is still difficult to fully understand what these national brothers and sisters experience everyday in living and dying for Christ. That being said, the Lord is using these terrible acts to bring others to faith, grow the church, and advance the gospel of Christ to the most difficult to reach people and places in the world.